Shanghaï
Shanghai

Shanghai

Take off for the pearl of the Orient, a megacity of age-old contrasts.

Airlines serving the destination

Round trip flight offers

5 good reasons to go to Shanghai

The Chinese skyline
The Chinese skyline
It is hard to believe that less than 200 years ago, Shanghai was just a small fishing port. Today, the city showcases the country's modernity with its forest of skyscrapers in the Pudong districts and People's Square, which are also among the tallest in the world and rival those in New York!
A city that never sleeps
A city that never sleeps
There is constant activity and no risk of getting bored in this bustling city. It has a dynamic, lively and diverse nightlife, with Chinese and foreign cinemas, theatres, opera, dance, shows, acrobatics and puppets, offering plenty to awaken the evening spectator in you.
Move along, there's plenty to see
Move along, there's plenty to see
With 6,340km², 24 million inhabitants and 18 districts, Shanghai is a city of superlatives where being immersed in the crowd is part of daily life. It can be a hair-raising in a car, but rest assured, the "expat" city has an excellent metro network and many signs are translated in English.
Embark on a culinary adventure
Embark on a culinary adventure
Chinese cuisine boasts countless delicious dishes combining sweet and savoury flavours, with hot and spicy notes usually served with pasta or rice. In Shanghai, however, you will mainly find varied cuisine that is not too spicy such as ravioli, "Cong You Bing" pancakes, “Zui Ji" chicken, steamed crab and noodles with XO sauce.
A mixed heritage
A mixed heritage
Traces of the city's colonial past can still be seen, whether in the architecture of the buildings, the English-style letterboxes or milk delivery tricycles. Even when they are less visible, buildings are often repainted red and bricks are drawn in trompe l'oeil with a brush.

To see / do

Culture and history

Reaching for the stars

Reaching for the stars

The futuristic and extravagant Pudong district, which sprung up in barely 20 years, is symbolic of the megacity. Choose your building according to your head for heights: the Oriental Pearl Tower (468m), World Financial Centre (492m) or Shanghai Tower (632m)... The one thing guaranteed at the top is a breathtaking view of the city!

Walk along the Bund

Walk along the Bund

The Bund is a quay built along the Huangpu River and lined with buildings with colonial architecture, the showcase of the "Paris of the East" of the 20th century. Popular with tourists and locals alike, it offers a spectacular view of the Pudong skyline, lit up with a thousand twinkling lights at nightfall. Early in the morning, you can even try out Tai-Chi, which is a popular form of exercise in China.

Lose yourself in the lilongs

Originally built in response to the demographic boom of the 20th century, lilongs are typical Shanghai housing estates where a popular lifestyle flourishes today. Similar to the Beijing Hutongs, they are composed of 2-storey terraced brick houses crammed together in narrow streets that are seemingly frozen in time, where scenes of daily life overflow onto the street.

Shanghai History Museum

Shanghai History Museum

The legendary and mysterious city of the Blue Lotus in the Adventures of Tintin no longer exists, and all that remains are decors inherited from the concessions. To give visitors a glimpse of it, this small museum located at the foot of the Oriental Pearl Tower recreates various scenes from daily life using wax figures to relate the history of Shanghai through different periods.

Traditional landscapes in the Yu garden

As you walk through the city’s old district, you will inevitably discover the charming Yu Garden. This well-kept garden, covering 2 hectares, is characteristic of the Ming dynasty and is delimited by the "Dragon walls". At the entrance is the famous HuXingTing Teahouse built in the middle of a pond and accessible via the "Nine Turn" bridge (built in a zigzag to keep away evil spirits).

Excursions

Nanjing Lu: the temple to shopping

Nanjing Lu: the temple to shopping

In spite of competition from other streets such as Huaihai, the unbeatable Nanjing Lu or "Nanking Road" remains the oldest and biggest shopping street in the city. 10km long and filled with constant activity, it is home to all kinds of shops. It even looks a bit like a Chinese Times Square at nightfall, with its multitude giant screens and passing crowds.

Cricket fighting

This very popular ancestral game has 6 million fans, of which 500,000 in Shanghai alone. Considered "lucky", crickets are admired for their short, epic fights and their distinct song. You can discover all about it at the bird and insect market in the old district. The short-lived "champions" are dried and framed with the history of their victories.

An evening of KTV

An evening of KTV

Karaoke, also known as KTV, is highly popular in Shanghai as well as in China and the rest of Asia. It only takes place in small private rooms that are rented by the hour, and the list of songs is very varied, including both Chinese and international. The atmosphere is good-natured: the aim is to have fun with family and friends.

Gastronomy

Tea culture

Tea is to China what wine is to France: essential. Culture in every sense of the word and an age-old art, tea is consumed every day in Shanghai as elsewhere in the country. Whether you prefer black or green tea, enjoy a cup at the HuXinTing Teahouse in the Yu Garden or in Tianshan Tea City, a market dedicated to tea and its accessories.

Xiaolongbao

Xiaolongbao

These small buns stuffed with succulent meat or vegetables are the most famous dish in Shanghai cuisine, and are generally served at breakfast with tea. Whether they are soft after being steamed or crispy after frying, these culinary delights filled with a hot sauce will treat you with every mouthful. You can buy them from street vendors and in restaurants throughout the city.

The art of street food

China, like all other Asian countries, is known for its travelling vendors on street corners, its outdoor grocery stands and markets of a thousand and one smells. These street “canteens” are the origin of street food. A far cry from our traditional restaurants, here you often eat standing up, sitting on the pavement or, if you’re lucky, at a makeshift table.

Hong Shao Rou

Hong Shao Rou

Hong Shao Rou is a classic local dish composed of pork marinated in sugar, spices and soy sauce. It was the favourite dish of Mao, the first President of the People's Republic of China and an eternally admired figure in the country. “Hong shao" is a Chinese cooking method for cooking meat slowly with a sauce so that each piece is coated in an amber colour.

A sweet note with a western hint

"Custard Pie", as it is known, is a tart made with eggs which is also referred to as "Chinese crème brûlée", once again revealing the influence of Western culture in China and especially in Shanghai, left by the settlers. It was probably originally Portuguese or English. The Chinese do not generally end their meals with a dessert, but European visitors won’t be able to resist!

Practical information

Currency

Le Yuan

Spoken languages

Mandarin Chinese

Time difference

+8h GMT

Distance

9458 Km

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* The information on this page is provided for information purposes only and is not exhaustive. The list of airlines is subject to change. Changes to flight offers may occur at any time and without notice. For details of connections, contact airlines or travel agencies.

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