Mauritius

Mauritius

Mauritius is a piece of paradise in the heart of the Indian Ocean for many reasons.

Airlines serving the destination

From Bordeaux, this destination can be served by the following companies:

Round trip flight offers

5 good reasons to go to Mauritius

Idyllic beaches
Idyllic beaches
Protected by the coral reef surrounding the lagoon, Mauritius’s beaches are exceptionally beautiful, perfect for enjoying long fine days relaxing in front of the turquoise ocean in the shade of coconut trees and Australian pines. The frequent trade winds also make it a good spot for water sports and catamaran sailing, which is very popular.
Luxury hotels
Luxury hotels
Without being the most expensive topical destination, Mauritius has developed a range of high-quality hotels with the collaboration of famous architects. It has also opened hospitality and catering schools, earning it an international reputation and ensuring flawless service.
Luxuriant plantlife
Luxuriant plantlife
Its abundant vegetation and elegant, curving mountains offer stunning scenery. The Black River Gorges National Park is home to the remainder of the original forest, while the Pamplemousse Garden houses a fine collection of plants imported by the settlers. There are even parks containing few giant tortoises, which were once widespread in the Mascarenes.
A true melting pot
A true melting pot
This small island in the Indian Ocean is a perfect example of mixing and peaceful coexistence between people and religions, with Hindus, Christians, Muslims and Buddhists. Although this ethnic melting pot was shaped by colonization, slavery and immigration, each community has learned to live in peace with the others and has adopted the Creole culture, which serves as a common language.
Creole architecture
Creole architecture
From working-class chalets to bourgeois houses and colonial dwellings, Creole architecture boasts a panoply of colours, ideas and techniques to adapt to the climate. As white as the coral reef or lavishly painted, these old residences, which have been more or less well maintained, are truly charming with their eaves decorated with pelmets.

To see / do

Culture and History

Visit the capital

Visit the capital

The central market is so colourful it is worth a visit to Port-Louis by itself. Pyramids of fruit and vegetables sit alongside mountains of spices, pots of cut flowers and stands of meat and tropical fish. Locally-made craft items are sold in the adjacent streets and the seafront is a hub of entertainment with bars, restaurants, shops and casinos.

A view of the city

The citadel, or Fort Adélaïde, was built by the English on a hill in the middle of Port-Louis. It offers an exceptional view of this rapidly changing capital where new buildings are gradually replacing old houses.

Discover the sugar plantations

Discover the sugar plantations

To understand the history of the island and its colonisation, you really need to visit a sugar plantation. You will discover the history of sugar, the stages of sugar cane cultivation and refining and perhaps even the agricultural production methods of rum. You can also visit the lavish colonial residences that still overlook the large plantations.

The legend of the dodo

This iconic Mauritian animal was for a long time believed to be no more than a myth spread by sailors. Just imagine, a bird the size of a turkey with stumpy wings, unable to fly or to run... the ideal prey! They were quickly wiped out by the Dutch and the animals introduced to the island (pigs, rats and monkeys) which ate their eggs. You can learn more at the recently renovated Natural History Museum in Port-Louis.

Hoist the sails!

Hoist the sails!

Model ships are without a doubt the jewel of Mauritian craftsmanship. Hundreds of workshops build and sell miniature replicas of old sailing ships, frigates, galleons and schooners. The island is the world’s no.1 producer!

Excursions

The sound and rhythm of Sega

This discipline combining music, songs and dance, finds its origin in the emancipation of slaves who, at the end of a week of forced labour, gathered around the fire to express their suffering and mock their masters to the sound of drums and lyrics with a double meaning. Now more joyous, this essential Creole style has become very popular all over the Mascarenes and even beyond the shores of the Indian Ocean.

Pamplemousse Garden

Pamplemousse Garden

This has to be the best place on the island to discover the local tropical flora along its shaded winding walks. The park is home to many varieties of rare spices and fragrant plants that were acclimatised in the 18th century by French botanist Pierre Poivre. The pools are home to flourishing white and yellow lotuses, which are sacred to Hindus and Buddhists, as well as giant water lilies with leaves measuring over a meter.

Getting into the swing of it

Inherited from British tradition, golf is very popular on the island and there are a dozen 18- and 9-hole courses. They are almost all owned by luxury hotels, but some do accept clients who are not guests. Mauritius has become a well-known destination for golfers all over the world.

Gastronomy

Rice first

Rice first

Mauritian cuisine reflects its population, with Indian, Chinese, European and Creole specialities. Served first, rice is nevertheless the basic ingredient of many dishes, including the famous local curry and its many variations (chicken, fish etc.) The only common denominator is the mix of Hindu Masala spices.

Rougail

Discover this delicious stew made with meat, sausages or fish simmered in a spicy sauce of tomato, garlic, ginger, herbs and chilli peppers. Let the lovely smell of Creole cooking wash over you.

Eating on the go

Eating on the go

People often eat on the street or enjoy a picnic in Mauritius. There are also many caravans and street vendors selling little gajaks (a snack similar to samosas) chilli cakes, bringelles (aubergine fritters), potato cakes, dholl puri, cassava/coconut cakes and freshly cut fruit for just a few rupees.

An island means a fish

You will discover an exceptional variety of fish here (marlin, parrotfish, tuna, coral hind etc.) as well as other seafood (squid, river prawns, crabs, lobsters) which are eaten grilled and sprinkled with lime.

Tea farming

Tea farming

There are still a few tea plantations in Mauritius, and in particular Bois Chéri where most of the tea production is carried out. As part of the tea route you can discover the fields, production process and, at the end of the visit, taste this popular beverage generally flavoured with vanilla or bergamot.

Chinese cuisine

The world’s most varied cuisine has also immigrated to the island, where the Chinese community continues to perpetuate their ancestral culinary knowledge, and especially cooking in a wok. “Mine frit” (fried noodles) and “bols renversés” (upturned bowls) are now typical Mauritian dishes.

Practical information

Currency

Roupie Mauricienne (MUR)

Spoken languages

English, French and Creole

Time difference

+3h GMT

Distance

9324 Km

You might also like

* The information on this page is provided for information purposes only and is not exhaustive. The list of airlines is subject to change. Changes to flight offers may occur at any time and without notice. For details of connections, contact airlines or travel agencies.

background-prepopin
Subscribe newsletter

Get in preview tips and new destinations